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Floating Fleet

 

The Museum maintains historic vessels the way they were intended to be used and seen—afloat on the water. They are representative of many of the vessels that were developed and used on the Chesapeake Bay. These rare survivors represent some of the last of their types. The Museum remains committed to maintaining them afloat and keeping them in operating or sailing condition.

 

Delaware is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1912 Delaware, River Tug

Delaware, a tugboat built in Bethel, Delaware, is a rare example of a typical early 20th century wooden river tug. Built in 1912 by William H. Smith, it may be one of two survivors of the notable boatyard. The Delaware hauled scrows often laden with lumber and towed ram schooners up and down the Eastern Shore’s narrow, winding rivers. She was donated to CBMM in 1991 by Bailey Marine Construction, Inc.

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The Edna E. Lockwood, a nine-log buygeye si the queen of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1889 Edna E. Lockwood, Bugeye

Edna E. Lockwood, a National Historic Landmark, and the sailing log-bottom bugeye, built in 1889 by John B. Harrison of Tilghman Island. Just as Native American dugout canoes were formed by carving out one log, a bugeye’s hull is constructed by pinning together a series of logs and hollowing them out as a unit. She was donated to CBMM in 1967 by John R. Kimberly.

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Isabelle is part of the floating fleet of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1926 Isabel, Trunk Cabin Power Cruiser

Isabel was built in 1926 by Mathews in Port Clinton, Ohio, but was brought to the Chesapeake as an exhibit boat for a boat show in Baltimore. The Black family of Baltimore purchased her, and she descended to the original owner’s daughter and son-in-law, Eleanor and Tom Requard, for the most of the rest of the century until she was donated to the Museum in 1995. Extensive work was done to the hull by the Cutts and Case boatyard around 2000-2002.

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The Edmee S. Log Canoe is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. Log Canoes – Edmee S. and Flying Cloud

The Chesapeake Bay’s racing log canoes are descended from workboats used by oyster tongers in the 19th century. Inevitably, competition among the watermen led to racing and organized races, and larger masts and sails were added in the pursuit of speed. On summer weekends today log canoes continue to compete in races on the nearby Miles River.

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Martha is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1934 Martha, Hoopers Island Dovetail

Martha, known as a Hooper Island draketail because of her unique stern design, was built by Bronza Parks in 1934 and was used for crabbing, oystering, and pleasure. She was donated to CBMM in 1989 by Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Warner.

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Old Point is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1909 Old Point, Crab Dredger

Old Point, constructed of seven logs in 1909, is an example of such a dredge boat used for dredging crabs throughout the winter. Old Point also hauled freight fish in the summer and carried oysters during the fall. She was donated to CBMM in 1984 and Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. DuPoint.

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The Potomac River Dory Boat is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1931 Potomac River Dory Boat

Built by Francis Raymond “Peg Leg” Hayden at Banks O’Dee, Maryland, the 37-foot “Big Dory” was part of a fleet of boats historically used for tonging oysters in the Chesapeake’s tributaries. She was donated in 1988 by the Calvert Marine Museum.

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The Pot Pie Skiff is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1961 Pot Pie Skiff

The Pot Pie Skiff is named for the place it was built—a neighborhood called Pot Pie in the town of Wittman, Maryland. Some also refer to the boat type as a tuck stern skiff, because of the way the back of the boat is tucked up out of the water on each side.

 

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The newly restored skipjack Rosie Parks is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1955 Rosie Parks, Skipjack

Rosie Parks, a skipjack, is a representative of Maryland’s state boat and was part of the last commercial fishing fleet under sail in the United States. In 2002, skipjacks were designated by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as one of America’s Eleven Most Endangered Places. Designed specifically for dreding up the vast quantities of oysters found on the Bay’s floor, only a handful of skipjacks continue to work the Bay. She was purchased by the Museum in 1975.

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The replica John Smith Shallop is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. John Smith Shallop Replica*

In the summer of 1608, a small boat or a “shallop” like this was used by Captain John Smith to make the first detailed European exploration of the Chesapeake Bay. In the decades that followed, the knowledge gained from Smith’s voyages played a key role in opening the interior of America to tens of thousands of European settlers. In the summer of 2007, a crew of 12 modern explorers set out in this replica of Smith’s shallop to retrace the 1608 voyages.

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Volunteer is part of the floating fleet at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. Volunteer, Smith Island Crab Scraping Boat Replica*

Volunteer is a replica of Leon Marsh’s 1990 Smith Island box-stern crab srape Darlene, as documented in Paula J. Johnson’s book “The Worksboats of Smith Island.” Built in 2002 by Museum boat shop volunteers and staff under the supervision of Tom Howell, the boat was intended for on-water use. As a modern replica, she has not been consider for inclusion in the Museum’s collection.

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The 1920 buyboat Winnie Estelle is part of the floating fleet of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland. 1920 Winnie Estelle, Buyboat

Winnie Estelle was built in Crisfield, Maryland by Noah T. Evans in 1920 and used as a workboat on the lower Chesapeake Bay for more than 50 years, carrying seafood and produce to market across the Chesapeake Bay. In the 1970s, she operated as an island trader, carrying lumber from Honduras to Belize, and later as a charter boat for divers. In early 2012, Michael Whitehill of Centreville, Maryland, purchased the boat, which was then donated to the Museum in 2014 by an anonymous donor.

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