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Edna E. Lockwood

Edna E. Lockwood dredging for oysters, c. 1950. Photograph by Don Edwards. Collection of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels, MD. Gift of Katherine Issa.
Edna E. Lockwood dredging for oysters, c. 1950. Photograph by Don Edwards. Collection of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels, MD. Gift of Katherine Issa.
Click HERE for the 2016-2018 Edna Lockwood restoration

 

Built in 1889 when the oyster industry was booming, the Edna E. Lockwood worked as an oyster dredge from 1889 to 1967. Edna’s deck is low to the water, making it easier to pull the oyster-loaded dredges aboard. Her hull, made of nine yellow pine logs, is an indication that Edna was designed at a time when sawn lumber was hard to get. Large trees were readily available, so boatbuilders used logs instead.

A National Historic Landmark, Edna is the last of the historic sailing log bugeyes. While the origin of the name “bugeye” is unknown, some say it may be derived from “buckie,” a Scottish word for oyster.

Built: 1889, Tilghman Island, MD by John B. Harrison

Length: 54 ft, 8 in (16.7 m)

Beam: 17 ft, 2 in (5.24 m)

Edna E. Lockwood, nine-log bugeye, 1889. Collection of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels, MD. Gift of John R. Kimberly. Maintenance of vessel provided for in part by the Kimberly-Clark Foundation Endowment Fund in memory of John R. Kimberly. 1967-155-1.

Donations to the Annual Fund generously support the maintenance of Edna E. Lockwood, as well as our other restoration, education, and exhibition programs.

Floating Fleet: Edna E. Lockwood, 1889 nine-log bugeye

Edna E. Lockwood: 2016-2018 Restoration