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Pot Pie Skiff

A waterman in a Pot Pie Skiff catches a crab in his dipnet after it comes to the surface on his trotline, c. 1979. Photograph by John Hurt Whitehead, III. Collection of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels, MD. Gift of the photographer.
A waterman in a Pot Pie Skiff catches a crab in his dipnet after it comes to the surface on his trotline, c. 1979. Photograph by John Hurt Whitehead, III. Collection of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels, MD. Gift of the photographer.

Waterman Lock Brando used this little skiff to catch crabs with a trotline, and perhaps to tong for a few oysters. The boat is steered by a simple mechanism with a stick on the starboard or right side, connected by ropes to the rudder in the stern. Chesapeake watermen like this kind of steering because they can steer with one hand (or even a knee if they have to) and net crabs with the other hand.

The Pot Pie Skiff is named for the place it was built—a neighborhood called Pot Pie in the town of Wittman, Maryland. Some also refer to the boat type as a tuck stern skiff, because of the way the back of the boat is tucked up out of the water on each side.

See our photo album of the Pot Pie skiff here. 

Built: 1961, Wittman MD, by George Jackson

Length: 26 ft (7.92 m)

Beam: 7 ft, 11 in (2.17 m)

Draft: 1 ft, 10 in (0.36 m)

Pot Pie or tuck stern skiff, 1961. Collection of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels, MD. Gift of Charles F. Novak. 2005-32-1.

Donations to the Annual Fund generously support the maintenance of the Pot Pie Skiff, as well as our other restoration, education, and exhibition programs.


Floating Fleet Report: Pot Pie Skiff, October 2015