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Meet: Richard C. Tilghman, Jr., Board Member

 

“The boatyard is one of the most unique aspects of the Museum. Few other places in the country offer such an interactive, amazing opportunity that passes these traditional crafts from one generation to the next.”

Richard C. Tilghman, Jr.
Richard C. Tilghman, Jr.

Richard Tilghman was born into an Eastern Shore legacy. He jokes that his dad’s family were the latecomers—arriving on the Shore in 1661, while his mother’s side arrived in 1649. Richard has spent his entire life around the Chesapeake Bay, and currently lives at—and manages—the family’s historic home in Tunis Mills. In fact, many of Richard’s favorite childhood memories involve the Bay.

He recalls family trips on the Bay Line from Baltimore to Norfolk as some of his favorite recollections. These overnight trips served as a reminder of the Bay’s role as a highway. Even then, he knew these trips would not last much longer, having been encouraged to take advantage of what is here, now. Realizing that the Bay is constantly changing, Richard understands how important it is to appreciate every aspect of it, in the here and now.

Richard has been involved with the Museum since 2008. He first became involved through his work with the Historical Society of Talbot County. Richard was president of their Board at that time, and was involved with an initiative to increase partnerships with other organizations. After a meeting with several members of CBMM, he was hooked. He joined the Board in 2009, and served a two-year term as Board Chair.

Richard brings not only an unmistakable enthusiasm and dedication for the Chesapeake Bay, but also an understanding of corporate governance that is attained only after years of experience. Following submarine service in the U.S. Navy, he graduated from University of Maryland Law School in 1975 and joined the law firm of Piper & Marbury in Baltimore a year later, following a clerkship with Maryland Court of Appeals. In 1981, he became Partner and was co-head of the firm’s Corporate and Securities Practice Group until he retired to the Eastern Shore at the end of 2005.

The Museum represents something special for Richard and his wife Beverly. “CBMM is so much more than a Museum,” commented Richard. “The interactive activities make it an experience.”
Richard points out that the Museum is preserving more than artifacts, it is preserving the culture of the “good ol’ Eastern Shore,” the way of life that is all about the Bay, where land and water intertwine.

When asked about the greatest strengths of CBMM, Richard doesn’t hesitate to speak about the Museum’s programs. “The boatyard is one of the most unique aspects of the Museum. Few other places in the country offer such an interactive, amazing opportunity that passes these traditional crafts from one generation to the next.” It is not hard to guess that the boatyard is Richard’s favorite part of the Museum.

Richard finds inspiration in many things at CBMM. He points out that the modern world is a sound bite, a video game, or a television show. The Museum brings us back to the “Old Shore,” representing a time when things moved much slower. CBMM not only preserves that culture, but presents and explains it to our guests. This preservation is imperative to the culture of the Eastern Shore, and Richard is a major part of that effort. He firmly believes if that the Museum went away, we would be much worse off.

We would like to thank Richard for his years of dedicated service to the Museum, and for many more years to come!