Tag Archives: Exhibition

Exhibition: Kent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops

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Photo by A. Aubrey Bodine. Copyright Jennifer B. Bodine

CBMM_KentCarvers_HollyGrove2_TrumpingtonKent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops is a new waterfowling exhibition opening Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md.

The exhibition shares the stories of Maryland’s Kent County carvers and hunting clubs through a collection of decoys, oral histories, historic photographs, and other artifacts.

 In the Rock Hall area of Kent County, virtually every young man grew up learning to hunt waterfowl in the early 1900s. That intimate knowledge of birds, their habits and their habitat translated into a marketable skill as gunning became the pastime of the wealthy. Rich photo documentation from the 1930s and 40s illustrate the camaraderie of the well-to-do business and professional men who flocked to Kent’s gunning shores to spend icy mornings in booby blinds, awaiting the arrival of ducks and geese and warm evenings by the club woodstove, where they feasted on local delicacies.

Oral history excerpts reveal the stories of hardworking guides, who found vital supplemental seasonal income. Captain John Glenn fashioned hand-chopped decoys from his Piney Neck home, “Decoy Farm,” and began to work with other local carvers to supply a wide variety of stool. While the “Rock Hall School of Carvers” was likely influenced by the work of Susquehanna Flats decoy makers, Kent carver Charlie Joiner learned directly from legendary Havre de Grace carver R. Madison Mitchell, and befriended the Ward brothers of Crisfield, developing his own distinct and notable style.

“Kent County’s bountiful waterfowl population and picturesque shorelines drew gentlemen hunters from the cities to organized gunning clubs, especially along the shores near Rock Hall and Eastern Neck,” said CBMM Collections Manager Jenifer Dolde, curator of the exhibition. “Knowledgeable local men served as guides, savvy property owners leased their land for clubs, and skillful Kent carvers created co-ops to craft decoys for the rigs of neighbors and club members.”

“Kent County has an enduring waterfowling culture—one that continues to flourish in the fields, necks and islands of the deeply-rural region,” said CBMM Chief Curator Pete Lesher. “We’re grateful for the support of this exhibition to be able to explore this important part of Chesapeake history with our guests.”

Kent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops  is generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury, and the world’s leading decoy auction firm, Guyette & Deeter. Entry to the exhibition is free for CBMM members or with general admission. Kent’s Carvers and Clubs will travel to the Waterfowl Festival in Easton, Md. November 9-11, 2018, and return to CBMM’s Waterfowling Building through March 31, 2019.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and culture of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving more than 70,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and numerous indoor and outdoor spaces, situated in a park-like, waterfront setting along the Miles River and St Michaels harbor. Charitable gifts to CBMM’s annual fund help support the non-profit’s exhibition, education, and restoration programs, with online giving and more information at cbmm.org/donate.

From now through October, 2018, CBMM’s guests can experience the log-hull restoration of the 1889 bugeye, Edna E. Lockwood, with more information at ednalockwood.org.

Exhibition Opening: Log Canoe Racing: Photographs by Morris Ellison

A new exhibition opening June 16, 2017, at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum will feature photos of the Chesapeake Bay’s iconic sailing log canoes. Opening in conjunction with the 30th annual Antique & Classic Boat Festival, the exhibition displays works by photographer Morris Ellison and continues in CBMM’s Van Lennep Auditorium through September 25, 2017.

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Exhibition exploring Potomac River waterfowling opens April 8

CBMM_PotomacDecoyExhibit(ST MICHAELS, MD – February 17, 2017) Washington, D.C.’s deep influence on the Potomac River’s unique waterfowling tools, traditions, and culture will be explored in a new exhibition at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., opening to the public on Saturday, April 8, 2017.

Potomac Waterfowling: Gunning the Nation’s River follows the harvesting history from 18th century statesmen like George Washington—who wrote about memorable hunts of the Potomac’s stunning numbers of waterfowl—to the 20th century, when the combination of Washington, D.C.’s growing economy and the rich Potomac environment spurred both commercial and sport markets for waterfowl.

Through decoys, photographs, period objects, and historic documents, Potomac Waterfowling demonstrates Washington, D.C.’s influences on the waterfowling culture of the Potomac—especially the decoys carved for the region’s gunning clubs. Often commissioned from craftsmen who hailed from far corners of the Chesapeake region, the canvasback rigs displayed a remarkable diversity of form. Whether the work of James “Corb” Reed, whose Chincoteague roots are evident in his stunning naturalistic decoys, to James E. Baines, who carved decoys for gunning on the Potomac that were dead ringers for Upper Bay birds, the melting pot quality of Washington D.C. clearly extended to its waterfowling culture in creative ways.

“The Potomac River decoy style is unlike anywhere else—it encompasses techniques and details found all over the Chesapeake Bay,” said CBMM Director of Education and Associate Curator Kate Livie, curator of the exhibition. “Decoy carvers were bringing the traditional decoy forms from their hometowns to the Potomac region when they moved to D.C. for work. So, you see it all—from classic Upper Bay birds to Chincoteague stools—all created to harvest the Potomac’s enormous waterfowl population.”

Potomac Waterfowling: Gunning the Nation’s River is generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury, and the world’s leading decoy auction firm, Guyette & Deeter. Entry to the exhibition is free for CBMM members or with general admission. Potomac Waterfowling will travel to the Waterfowl Festival in Easton, Md. November 10-12, 2017, and return to CBMM’s Waterfowling Building through March 2018.

CBMM and East Coast Decoy Collectors Association members will be invited to a private exhibition preview reception on the evening of Friday, April 7, with light refreshments served. The reception is free for CBMM and ECDCA members, with space limited and registration needed by contacting Nancy Wells at nwells@cbmm.org or 410-745-4991 by April 1.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving more than 77,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated in a park-like, waterfront setting along the Miles River and St Michaels harbor. Charitable gifts to CBMM’s annual fund help support the non-profit’s exhibition, education, and restoration programs, with online giving and more information at cbmm.org/donate.

From now through 2018, CBMM’s guests can experience the log-hull restoration of the 1889 bugeye, Edna E. Lockwood, with more information at ednalockwood.org.

 

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PHOTOS:

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A selection of decoys by Potomac River carvers Corb Reed, James Baines, Albert Cambell, and related objects tell the story of gunning on the ‘Nation’s River.’ A melting pot of styles and traditions from the Chesapeake and beyond can be found in the decoys, which were commissioned for exclusive gunning clubs like Sycamore Landing and Possum Point, where 20th century movers and shakers pursued the river’s immense flocks of waterfowl. These decoys and more will be featured in Potomac Waterfowling: Gunning the Nation’s River exhibition, opening on Saturday, April 8 at CBMM in St. Michaels, Md. Generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury, and Guyette & Deeter, Potomac Waterfowling continues through March 2018.

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Robert de Gast’s Chesapeake opens at CBMM May 12

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Photo by Robert de Gast

(ST MICHAELS, MD – January 12, 2017) This spring, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. will open the very first exhibition to showcase the black-and-white Chesapeake-focused photography of Robert de Gast.

This major exhibition, Robert de Gast’s Chesapeake, runs May 12, 2017 through April 8, 2018, and features 80 photographs curated from the more than 10,000 by de Gast in CBMM’s collection.

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Photo by Robert de Gast

De Gast’s black-and-white photography gained widespread attention with the publication of his book, The Oystermen of the Chesapeake, in 1970. Local author and writer for The Baltimore Sun Tom Horton wrote that de Gast “produced a work of genius, one of the finest books on the bay ever done. His black-and-white photographs captured the elemental nature of watermen and their work better than color ever could.”

Born in Holland, de Gast (1936–2016) immigrated to the United States with his family after World War II. He volunteered for the U.S. Army, which sent him to photography school. First stationed in Washington, D.C., de Gast ultimately settled in Annapolis, Md., where he briefly worked with American photographer Marion E. Warren before leaving to work as an independent photojournalist and commercial photographer. His work was published in Skipper, Popular Boating, US Naval Institute Proceedings, Sail, The Rudder, Chesapeake Bay Magazine, and Smithsonian from the 1960s to the 1980s. After The Oystermen, de Gast went on to publish The Lighthouses of Chesapeake Bay (1973) and a journal of a cruise, Western Wind, Eastern Shore: A Sailing Cruise around the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia (1975).

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Robert de Gast Chesapeake Bay photos

The works in the exhibition are principally drawn from these three books and his assignment photography for various periodicals. Although he never completed high school, de Gast showed a gift for writing that is reflected in his books’ essays as well as in later books of photography and prose.

Robert de Gast’s Chesapeake will include 80 matted and framed exhibition prints, shown in a manner that enhances the stark aesthetic, artistic perspective, and intimate familiarity of his work. While it is on show, CBMM is planning a wide range of accompanying programming, including a speaker’s series.

“I’m very excited for these exquisite photographs to emerge from CBMM’s collection for all to enjoy,” commented CBMM President Kristen Greenaway. “Robert de Gast’s work is exceptional in capturing the Chesapeake’s stories and quintessentially Eastern Shore sense of place through his keen eye and captivating photographic style.

“Last August my son and I—along with a dear friend—traced de Gast’s journey on our own small boat adventure, an incredible opportunity and captivating way of experiencing and exploring the Chesapeake Bay. De Gast’s photographs and text take you on this journey and beyond, and will bring the timeless beauty of the Chesapeake to St. Michaels and CBMM for all to enjoy.”

A limited-edition exhibition catalogue—which will be available for purchase in the Museum Store after the exhibition opens—includes images from the exhibition, complemented by essays from journalist Randall Peffer, editor Robert Brugger, Chesapeake photographer David Harp, and CBMM’s chief curator Pete Lesher, who curated the exhibition and collected recorded interviews with the artist toward the end of de Gast’s life.

Robert de Gast’s Chesapeake is made possible through the generous support of Mr. &
Mrs. Norman H. Plummer, Anne & Frank Mickey, Maryland State Arts Council, Ashton Design, and Elizabeth C. Moose.

CBMM’s collection holds more than 68,000 items, all related to the Chesapeake Bay. Items include the largest collection of Chesapeake Bay watercraft in the world, along with decoys and waterfowling objects, marine engines, maritime models, paintings, prints, photography, and objects of maritime trade. Numerous historic structures are included in the collection, including the Point Lookout Bell Tower, Tolchester Beach Bandstand, and the 1879 Hooper Strait Lighthouse, which was moved to its current location in 1966.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving more than 78,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated in a park-like, waterfront setting along the Miles River and St Michaels harbor. Charitable gifts to CBMM’s annual fund help preserve the objects in CBMM’s collection, with online giving and more information at cbmm.org/donate.

From now through 2018, CBMM’s guests can experience the log-hull restoration of the 1889 bugeye, Edna E. Lockwood, with more information at ednalockwood.org. For more information about CBMM, visit cbmm.org.

Experience Robert de Gast’s Chesapeake online here.

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PHOTOS:

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This self-portrait of Robert de Gast was taken in the cockpit of his 21-foot Dovekie Fiddler. He was exploring the Potomac River in September 1994 during one of the cruises that led to his book, Five Fair Rivers. On May 12, 2017, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., will open Robert de Gast’s Chesapeake, the first exhibition to showcase the black-and-white Chesapeake-focused photography of Robert de Gast. The special exhibition continues through April, 2018, with more information at cbmm.org.

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A Robert de Gast photograph of a hydraulic rig from 1969. In an essay in his book, Oystermen of the Chesapeake, de Gast wrote “A recent development is the hydraulic rig, which operates twice as fast … The installation of a hydraulic rig requires several thousand more dollars than the conventional rig, but with a little luck could pay back its investment in one season.” On May 12, 2017, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., will open Robert de Gast’s Chesapeake, the first exhibition to showcase the black-and-white Chesapeake-focused photography of Robert de Gast. The special exhibition continues through April, 2018, with more information at cbmm.org.

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A Robert de Gast photograph of neighbors’ children playing in a small rowing skiff on Mill Creek near Annapolis. According to a 2015 interview, de Gast said, “I had children of my own, and I was very often reporting on their activities, oftentimes involving the water, so I was always drawn to children in boats.” The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., will open Robert de Gast’s Chesapeake, a special exhibition featuring his black-and-white photography of the Chesapeake region, on May 12, 2017. The special exhibition continues through April, 2018, with more information at cbmm.org.

 

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A Broad Reach exhibition strikes at CBMM March 26

CBMM_BroadReach_Strikes(ST MICHAELS, MD – January 4, 2017) With artifacts ranging from gilded eagles to a silver lifesaving medal, a tugboat’s steam engine, to an intimate scene of crab pickers, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s 50th anniversary exhibition, A Broad Reach: 50 Years of Collecting will close to the public on March 26, 2017.

A Broad Reach opened on May 23, 2015, with the purpose of featuring 50 objects in CBMM’s collection with the richest stories to tell, from a humble fire axe to marine art—chosen from more than 68,000 objects in total. Some are arresting, some are transcendent—all explore the Chesapeake and its rapidly changing environment and culture. Others represent bygone Chesapeake trades that have all but disappeared in recent years.

“The public’s response to this exhibition has been outstanding,” said CBMM’s Chief Curator Pete Lesher. “It’s a rare opportunity to see such outstanding highlights from our collection, and this winter gives a great opportunity to visit us and take it all in, before we put our white gloves back on and meticulously store them all away. Winter is also the best time to visit the boatyard, especially with the Edna E. Lockwood log hull restoration now in full swing.”

A Broad Reach is made possible through the generous support of CBMM donors and 50th anniversary corporate partners, including PNC Financial Services Group, American Cruise Lines, Benson & Mangold, Chesapeake Shipbuilding, Easton Utilities, Fairfield Inn & Suites Easton, Goetze’s Candy, Graul’s Market, Guilford & Company, Hambleton Inn, Hawthorn–PNC Family Wealth, Higgins & Spencer, Patriot Cruises, Maryland State Arts Council, Tidewater Inn, and The Vane Brothers Company. CBMM’s 50th anniversary partners include the Academy for Lifelong Learning, St. Michaels Art League, and Christmas in St. Michaels.

CBMM_BroadReachCatalogueA Broad Reach is accompanied by a commemorative catalogue and online exhibition at abroadreach.cbmm.org. Both feature images and interpretive text of the objects in the exhibition, many of which were photographed by noted Chesapeake photographer David Harp. Limited-edition catalogues are available for purchase at the Museum Store and online at shop.cbmm.org, with proceeds benefiting the children and adults served by CBMM’s educational programs.

The exhibition is free for CBMM members and with general two-day admission. Situated on 18 waterfront acres with 12 exhibition buildings, CBMM is open daily except when Talbot County Public Schools are closed due to inclement weather.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving more than 75,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated in a park-like, waterfront setting along the Miles River and St Michaels harbor. Charitable gifts to the museum’s Annual Fund enable CBMM to educate and inspire the next generation of Chesapeake Bay stewards, and can be made online at cbmm.org/donate.

From now through 2018, CBMM guests can experience the log-hull restoration of the 1889 bugeye, Edna E. Lockwood, with all work done in full public view and more information at ednalockwood.org. For more information about CBMM, visit cbmm.org.

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PHOTOS:

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The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s 50th anniversary exhibition, A Broad Reach: 50 Years of Collecting, as seen here in CBMM’s Steamboat Building, will close to the public in St. Michaels, Md. on March 26, 2017. The exhibition features significant objects in CBMM’s collection with the richest stories to tell, and is free for CBMM members or with general two-day admission.  For more information, visit cbmm.org or call 410-745-2916.

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The works featured in the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s exhibition A Broad Reach: 50 Years of Collecting and its commemorative catalogue, shown here, range from gilded eagles to a silver lifesaving medal, a tugboat’s steam engine, to an intimate scene of crab pickers. The exhibition closes to the public at CBMM in St. Michaels, Md. on March 26, 2017. The limited edition catalogue is available at the Museum Store or at shop.cbmm.org, with the online exhibition at abroadreach.cbmm.org

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New photo props promote Snapshots to Selfies online exhibition

CBMM_S2S_CrabPickerProp(ST MICHAELS, MD – June 17, 2016) The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum has recently brought its new online exhibition Snapshots to Selfies: 50 Years of Chesapeake Summers to its physical campus through the addition of three new photo props.

The props are designed to encourage members and guests to contribute to the online photo exhibition, with the social media hashtag #cbmmsnapshots used and photos uploaded to the exhibition at snapshots.cbmm.org. The exhibition runs through November 30, 2017.

The online exhibition currently features more than 240 CBMM_S2S_BootPropsubmitted and searchable photos covering the last 50 summers of people living, working, and playing on the Chesapeake Bay.  CBMM invites members and guests to contribute to the ongoing exhibition by taking a photo with one of the three props, which are all inspired by the traditions and practices of the Chesapeake Bay. Props include an oversized pair of waterman’s boots, an oversized crab pot, and a pair of crab pickers.

CBMM_S2S_CrabPotPropEstablished in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission.

Serving nearly 70,000 guests each year, the museum’s campus
includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated on 18 waterfront acres along the Miles River and St. Michaels’ harbor. To see the exhibition, visit snapshots.cbmm.org or visit www.cbmm.org.

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PHOTOS:

Click on photos to download high resolution.

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CBMM Development Manager Jennifer Matthews and 1 North Wealth’s Margo Cook of Centreville, Md. are photographed in one of the museum’s new props as a crab picker. The prop is one of three to promote CBMM’s newest online exhibition, Snapshots to Selfies: 50 Years of Chesapeake Summers, which continues through November 30, 2017 and features more than 240 submitted and searchable photos covering the last 50 summers of people living, working, and playing on the Chesapeake Bay. Other props include a large pair of white waterman’s boots and a giant crab pot where visitors can be the crab. Using the hashtag #cbmmsnapshots, CBMM members and guests are encouraged to take their photos in the new cutouts share them on social media, and submit their photos to the community-curated exhibition at snapshots.cbmm.org.

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Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum Chairman Jim Harris is photographed at CBMM in St. Michaels, Md. in oversized white waterman’s boots that are now serving as a new photo prop to promote the museum’s newest online exhibition, Snapshots to Selfies: 50 Years of Chesapeake Summers. Other props include a scene of crab pickers and a giant crab pot where guests can be the crab. Using the hashtag #cbmmsnapshots, CBMM members and guests are encouraged to take their photos in the new cutouts, share them on social media, and submit their photos to the community curated exhibition at snapshots.cbmm.org. The exhibition runs through November 30, 2017.

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CBMM intern Tatum Welsh is photographed in the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s new crab pot photo prop in St. Michaels, Md.  The prop is one of three to promote CBMM’s newest online exhibition, Snapshots to Selfies: 50 Years of Chesapeake Summers, which continues through November 30, 2017 and features more than 240 submitted and searchable photos covering the last 50 summers of people living, working, and playing on the Chesapeake Bay. Other props include a scene of crab pickers and a giant pair of white waterman’s boots. Using the hashtag #cbmmsnapshots, CBMM members and guests are encouraged to take their photos in the new cutouts, share them on social media, and submit their photos to the community-curated exhibition at snapshots.cbmm.org.

 

the ferry Governor Emerson C. Harrington II departing Claiborne, an important terminal for cross-bay ferries in the twentieth century. Before the Chesapeake Bay Bridge opened in 1952, a system of ferries daily carried people, goods, and vehicles, connecting Annapolis to Claiborne, and later Sandy Point to Kent Island, with a shorter crossing from Romancoke on Kent Island to Claiborne. Emerson C. Harrington II served this shorter crossing. Photograph by H. Robins Hollyday, c. 1948, collection of Talbot Historical Society

Members Reception: Hollyday Photo Exhibition

Members Reception: Hollyday Photo Exhibition
Wednesday, June 8
5pm in the Van Lennep Auditorium. RSVP to 410-745-4991 or dcollison@cbmm.org

Please join us for a member reception exploring CBMM’s latest photo exhibition, Maritime Talbot County: Photographs by H. Robins Hollyday. The exhibition, drawn from the Hollyday collection of Easton’s Talbot Historical Society, features extraordinary images of Eastern Shore people and places from land, water, and air through much of the 20th century. Free to CBMM and Talbot Historical Society members. Please complete the form below to register or call Nancy Wells at 410-745-4991.

the ferry Governor Emerson C. Harrington II departing Claiborne, an important terminal for cross-bay ferries in the twentieth century. Before the Chesapeake Bay Bridge opened in 1952, a system of ferries daily carried people, goods, and vehicles, connecting Annapolis to Claiborne, and later Sandy Point to Kent Island, with a shorter crossing from Romancoke on Kent Island to Claiborne. Emerson C. Harrington II served this shorter crossing. Photograph by H. Robins Hollyday, c. 1948, collection of Talbot Historical Society

EXHIBITION OPENING: Maritime Talbot County, Photographs by H. Robins Hollyday

Pictured: The ferry Governor Emerson C. Harrington II departing Claiborne, an important terminal for cross-bay ferries in the twentieth century. Before the Chesapeake Bay Bridge opened in 1952, a system of ferries daily carried people, goods, and vehicles, connecting Annapolis to Claiborne, and later Sandy Point to Kent Island, with a shorter crossing from Romancoke on Kent Island to Claiborne. Emerson C. Harrington II served this shorter crossing.

Photograph by H. Robins Hollyday, c. 1948, collection of Talbot Historical Society

OPENS FEBRUARY 16, 2016 through OCTOBER, 2016

Photographer H. Robins “Bob” Hollyday (1898-1981) documented Eastern Shore people and places from land, water, and air through much of the 20th century. Beginning in 1929, Hollyday teamed with Talbot County’s most well-known aviator, Malcolm Hathaway, to fly the skies over the county. Hollyday would hang out of the open cockpit plane with a large, cumbersome camera to take photographs. Hollyday photographed properties from the air for the area’s realtors, captured events for local business and society, and documented the region’s culture. His photographs reflect a distinct sense of place, and in Talbot County, which claims 600 miles of shoreline, that character is closely intertwined with the water. In these images, Hollyday documented the area’s waterborne transportation and recreation, waterside industry, and fisheries.
H. Robins Hollyday’s extensive photograph collection is preserved by the Talbot Historical Society in Easton, Maryland, which created this exhibition.

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Hollyday photo exhibition opens in St. Michaels February 16

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H. Robins “Bob” Hollyday (1898-1981), photographed Eastern Shore people and places from land, water, and air through much of the 20th century, and now his work is being featured in a new temporary exhibition in St. Michaels, Md.

With photographs drawn from the Hollyday collection of Easton’s Talbot Historical Society, Maritime Talbot County: Photographs by H. Robins Hollyday opens to the general public on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 in the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s Van Lennep Auditorium and continues through October 16, 2016.

Beginning in 1929, Hollyday teamed with Talbot County’s most well-known aviator, Malcom Hathaway, to capture aerial views of the county. Hollyday would hang out of the open cockpit plane with a large, cumbersome camera to take his photographs. He photographed properties from the air for the area’s realtors, captured events for local businesses and society, and documented the region’s culture.

“Hollyday’s photographs reflect a distinct sense of place, and in Talbot County, which claims 600 miles of shoreline, that character is closely intertwined with the water,” says CBMM Chief Curator Pete Lesher. “In these images, Hollyday documented the area’s waterborne transportation and recreation, waterside industry, and fisheries.”

“We’re very pleased to be working with the historical society on this project,” said CBMM President Kristen Greenaway. “While Hollyday’s work is focused on Talbot County, it is an excellent representation of the entire Chesapeake region for many to appreciate and enjoy.”

The museum is open daily throughout the exhibition dates and is free for CBMM members and on weekdays in February, or with general museum admission.

For more information, visit www.cbmm.org or call 410-745-2916.

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The ferry Governor Emerson C. Harrington II departing Claiborne, an important terminal for cross-bay ferries in the 20th century. Before the Chesapeake Bay Bridge opened in 1952, a system of ferries carried people, goods, and vehicles daily, connecting Annapolis to Claiborne, and later Sandy Point to Kent Island, with a shorter crossing from Romancoke on Kent Island to Claiborne. Emerson C. Harrington II served this shorter crossing. Photograph by H. Robins Hollyday, c. 1948, collection of Talbot Historical Society. This image and others by H. Robins Hollyday will be displayed in a new special exhibition, Maritime Talbot County at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. beginning February 16, 2016 and continuing through October 16, 2016. For more information, visit www.cbmm.org.

Photographer Jay Fleming

EXHIBITION OPENING: The Unseen Chesapeake: Capturing the Bay’s Wild, Forgotten Landscapes

The Unseen Chesapeake features a selection of photographs from Jay Fleming, all captured in or along the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, and can be seen in the Van Lennep Auditorium of the museum’s Steamboat Building. The images document the Chesapeake’s seldom-seen animals, vistas, and traditions encountered by Fleming, from techniques like oyster nippering to a close-up look at a recent Bay newcomer, the pelican.

A CBMM members-only meet and greet with the photographer will take place from 5:30–6:30 pm. on June 25, with an opening reception for the general public from 6:30–7:30 pm. Participants will have the opportunity to purchase signed prints of Fleming’s works at the event. To RSVP for the member meet and greet, email CBMM’s Membership Manager Debbie Collison at dcollison@cbmm.org or call 410-745-4991.