Tag Archives: Guyette & Deeter

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Kent’s Carvers and Clubs opens at CBMM April 14

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Photo by A. Aubrey Bodine. Copyright Jennifer B. Bodine

CBMM_KentCarvers_HollyGrove1_Trumpington(ST MICHAELS, MD – January 30, 2018) Kent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops is a new waterfowling exhibition opening Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md.

The exhibition shares the stories of Maryland’s Kent County carvers and hunting clubs through a collection of decoys, oral histories, historic photographs, and other artifacts.

In the Rock Hall area of Kent County, virtually every young man grew up learning to hunt waterfowl in the early 1900s. That intimate knowledge of birds, their habits and their habitat translated into a marketable skill as gunning became the pastime of the wealthy. Rich photo documentation from the 1930s and 40s illustrate the camaraderie of the well-to-do business and professional men who flocked to Kent’s gunning shores to spend icy mornings in booby blinds, awaiting the arrival of ducks and geese and warm evenings by the club woodstove, where they feasted on local delicacies.

Oral history excerpts reveal the stories of hardworking guides, who found vital supplemental seasonal income. Captain John Glenn fashioned hand-chopped decoys from his Piney Neck home, “Decoy Farm,” and began to work with other local carvers to supply a wide variety of stool. While the “Rock Hall School of Carvers” was likely influenced by the work of Susquehanna Flats decoy makers, Kent carver Charlie Joiner learned directly from legendary Havre de Grace carver R. Madison Mitchell, and befriended the Ward brothers of Crisfield, developing his own distinct and notable style.

“Kent County’s bountiful waterfowl population and picturesque shorelines drew gentlemen hunters from the cities to organized gunning clubs, especially along the shores near Rock Hall and Eastern Neck,” said CBMM Collections Manager Jenifer Dolde, curator of the exhibition. “Knowledgeable local men served as guides, savvy property owners leased their land for clubs, and skillful Kent carvers created co-ops to craft decoys for the rigs of neighbors and club members.”

“Kent County has an enduring waterfowling culture—one that continues to flourish in the fields, necks and islands of the deeply-rural region,” said CBMM Chief Curator Pete Lesher. “We’re grateful for the support of this exhibition to be able to explore this important part of Chesapeake history with our guests.”

GuyetteDeeterWEBONLYKent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops  is generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury, and the world’s leading decoy auction firm, Guyette & Deeter. Entry to the exhibition is free for CBMM members or with general admission. Kent’s Carvers and Clubs will travel to the Waterfowl Festival in Easton, Md. November 9-11, 2018, and return to CBMM’s Waterfowling Building through March 31, 2019.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and culture of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving more than 70,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and numerous indoor and outdoor spaces, situated in a park-like, waterfront setting along the Miles River and St Michaels harbor. Charitable gifts to CBMM’s annual fund help support the non-profit’s exhibition, education, and restoration programs, with online giving and more information at cbmm.org/donate.

From now through October, 2018, CBMM’s guests can experience the log-hull restoration of the 1889 bugeye, Edna E. Lockwood, with more information at ednalockwood.org.

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PHOTOS:

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Two duck hunters take aim from a “booby” blind on the lower Chester River, c. 1950. Photo by A. Aubrey Bodine © Jennifer B. Bodine, courtesy of aaubreybodine.com. Kent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops is a new exhibition opening Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. The exhibition continues through March 31, 2019, with more at cbmm.org.    

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A member relaxes after the day’s shoot in thee Holly Grove gunning club room, on Kent County’s Eastern Neck, c. 1940. Courtesy of the Trumpington Collection. Kent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops is a new exhibition opening Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. The exhibition continues through March 31, 2019, with more at cbmm.org.

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Gunners wade into shore as their guide prepares to pull in the decoy rig from the waters near the Holly Grove gunning club, on Kent County’s Eastern Neck, c. 1940. Courtesy of the Trumpington Collection. Kent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops is a new exhibition opening Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. The exhibition continues through March 31, 2019, with more at cbmm.org.

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Exhibition exploring Potomac River waterfowling opens April 8

CBMM_PotomacDecoyExhibit(ST MICHAELS, MD – February 17, 2017) Washington, D.C.’s deep influence on the Potomac River’s unique waterfowling tools, traditions, and culture will be explored in a new exhibition at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., opening to the public on Saturday, April 8, 2017.

Potomac Waterfowling: Gunning the Nation’s River follows the harvesting history from 18th century statesmen like George Washington—who wrote about memorable hunts of the Potomac’s stunning numbers of waterfowl—to the 20th century, when the combination of Washington, D.C.’s growing economy and the rich Potomac environment spurred both commercial and sport markets for waterfowl.

Through decoys, photographs, period objects, and historic documents, Potomac Waterfowling demonstrates Washington, D.C.’s influences on the waterfowling culture of the Potomac—especially the decoys carved for the region’s gunning clubs. Often commissioned from craftsmen who hailed from far corners of the Chesapeake region, the canvasback rigs displayed a remarkable diversity of form. Whether the work of James “Corb” Reed, whose Chincoteague roots are evident in his stunning naturalistic decoys, to James E. Baines, who carved decoys for gunning on the Potomac that were dead ringers for Upper Bay birds, the melting pot quality of Washington D.C. clearly extended to its waterfowling culture in creative ways.

“The Potomac River decoy style is unlike anywhere else—it encompasses techniques and details found all over the Chesapeake Bay,” said CBMM Director of Education and Associate Curator Kate Livie, curator of the exhibition. “Decoy carvers were bringing the traditional decoy forms from their hometowns to the Potomac region when they moved to D.C. for work. So, you see it all—from classic Upper Bay birds to Chincoteague stools—all created to harvest the Potomac’s enormous waterfowl population.”

Potomac Waterfowling: Gunning the Nation’s River is generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury, and the world’s leading decoy auction firm, Guyette & Deeter. Entry to the exhibition is free for CBMM members or with general admission. Potomac Waterfowling will travel to the Waterfowl Festival in Easton, Md. November 10-12, 2017, and return to CBMM’s Waterfowling Building through March 2018.

CBMM and East Coast Decoy Collectors Association members will be invited to a private exhibition preview reception on the evening of Friday, April 7, with light refreshments served. The reception is free for CBMM and ECDCA members, with space limited and registration needed by contacting Nancy Wells at nwells@cbmm.org or 410-745-4991 by April 1.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving more than 77,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated in a park-like, waterfront setting along the Miles River and St Michaels harbor. Charitable gifts to CBMM’s annual fund help support the non-profit’s exhibition, education, and restoration programs, with online giving and more information at cbmm.org/donate.

From now through 2018, CBMM’s guests can experience the log-hull restoration of the 1889 bugeye, Edna E. Lockwood, with more information at ednalockwood.org.

 

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PHOTOS:

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A selection of decoys by Potomac River carvers Corb Reed, James Baines, Albert Cambell, and related objects tell the story of gunning on the ‘Nation’s River.’ A melting pot of styles and traditions from the Chesapeake and beyond can be found in the decoys, which were commissioned for exclusive gunning clubs like Sycamore Landing and Possum Point, where 20th century movers and shakers pursued the river’s immense flocks of waterfowl. These decoys and more will be featured in Potomac Waterfowling: Gunning the Nation’s River exhibition, opening on Saturday, April 8 at CBMM in St. Michaels, Md. Generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury, and Guyette & Deeter, Potomac Waterfowling continues through March 2018.

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New Chesapeake Ammo, Camo and Calls waterfowling exhibition opens April 9 at CBMM

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(ST MICHAELS, MD – February 11, 2016)
The transformation of Chesapeake waterfowling gear, tools, and clothing over the last 100 years will be explored through artifacts, advertising ephemera, and photographs in a new exhibition at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., opening April 9, 2016.

Chesapeake Ammo, Camo and Calls explores the fact that waterfowling is not just about decoys. A gunner needs a whole field kit of gear and tools—from clothing to guns, ammunition to duck and goose calls—to have a successful day in the field. Over the last 100 years, these waterfowling essentials have transformed from simple to sophisticated, reflecting innovation in firearm technology, camouflage development, and the ongoing search for an ever-more-persuasive call. Though today’s gear is more advanced in form, the function remains the same—to mimic the Chesapeake marshes, call in waterfowl on the wing, and finally get the perfect shot.

From the evolution of shotguns to the vivid, beautiful boxes made to hold ammunition,Chesapeake Ammo, Camo and Calls explores the personal, intimate way that innovation has changed the sportsman’s field experience.

“Visitors may recognize some of the objects from their own shoots from days past, or calls, ammunition bags and clothing similar to things their grandfather might have owned,” commented CBMM Director of Education Kate Livie, who is curating the exhibition. “From the days when people carried actual powder horns into the blind to the photo-realistic camo sportsmen wear today, we want to show the resourcefulness and innovation inspired by waterfowling.”

Chesapeake Ammo, Camo and Calls is generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury, the world’s leading decoy auction firm, Guyette & Deeter, and Gourmet by the Bay. Entry to the exhibition is free for CBMM members or with general admission. Chesapeake Ammo, Camo and Calls will travel to the Waterfowl Festival in Easton, Md. on November 11-13, 2016, and return to the museum’s Waterfowling Building for exhibition through March, 2017.

CBMM members along with those of the East Coast Decoy Collectors Association will be invited to a private exhibition preview reception on Friday, April 8 beginning at 5:30pm, with light refreshments served. The reception is free for CBMM and ECDCA members, with space limited and pre-registration required by calling Tom Oates at 410-745-4950 by April 1.

For more information, visit www.cbmm.org or call 410-745-2916.

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PHOTO:

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The transformation of Chesapeake waterfowling gear, tools, and clothing over the last 100 years will be shared through artifacts, advertising, and photographs in the new Chesapeake Ammo, Camo and Calls exhibition opening Saturday, April 9 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. Generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury and the world’s leading decoy auction firm, Guyette & Deeter, the exhibition continues through March, 2017. For more information, visit www.cbmm.org.

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Chesapeake Swan Song exhibition featured at Waterfowl Festival Artifacts Exhibit

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Photo courtesy C. John Sullivan

Featured in this year’s Waterfowl Festival Artifacts Exhibit will be the story of the evolving relationship between the people and swans of the Chesapeake Bay as told through a curated collection of decoys, photographs, and artifacts in the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s Chesapeake Swan Song: From Commodity to Conservation. The 45th annual festival takes place November 13-15, 2015 throughout various venues in Easton, Md. After the festival, the exhibition will be displayed in CBMM’s Waterfowling Building through April 3, 2016.

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Photo by David Harp

The exhibition is generously sponsored by Guyette & Deeter—the world’s leading decoy auction firm—Judy and Henry Stansbury, and Gourmet by the Bay in St. Michaels, Md.

Over the last 150 years, the population and perception of swans has dramatically changed within the Chesapeake region. These magnificent waterfowl—today valued for their aesthetic beauty and rarity—were once part of the bay’s commercial harvest.

Hunted for sport, food, and feathers, the Chesapeake’s plummeting swan population was protected by the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Since then, the bay’s swans have become treasured ornaments, inspiring artists, bird watchers, and photographers. They have also become a source of controversy, provoking bitter debate in the early 21st century as the State of Maryland sought to control the proliferating population of invasive mute swans.

For thousands of years, two native swan species—tundra and trumpeter—have migrated from the Arctic to the protected coves of the Chesapeake Bay. Flying south in white wedges, their arrival signified sustenance for the bay’s native tribes and later, for the colonists who scratched out a living along the bay’s tributaries. In the 19th century, equipped with accurate, inexpensive firearms, hunters harvested more swans than ever before, shipping birds to Baltimore for fancy suppers. The snowy white feathers were in high demand in New York and London, where they were used to decorate women’s hats and made into powder puffs and foamy slippers. To entice the birds within range, carvers throughout the Chesapeake crafted huge swan decoys, from crude to elaborate, that mimicked swans feeding, swimming, and preening.

Swans, huge and elegant, have come to represent our evolving ideas regarding the Chesapeake environment. From a source of sustenance to a driver of mass harvest, a creature of conservation to a provocative invasive, swans convey the changing story of the Chesapeake’s hunting culture.

Chesapeake Swan Song explores this interwoven story of swans and people on the Chesapeake Bay through a selection of swan decoys, artifacts, and ephemera from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Waterfowl Festival Inc. is dedicated to wildlife conservation, the promotion of wildlife art, and the celebration of life on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. CBMM’s mission is to preserve and explore the history, environment and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay. For more information, visit www.waterfowlfestival.org or www.cbmm.org.

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PHOTOS

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Decoys like the Barnes/Holly example above will be joined by other examples from around the Bay in Chesapeake Swan Song: From Commodity to Conservation, which will be featured in the Waterfowl Festival’s artifacts exhibit at Easton High School November 13-15. The exhibition shares the story of the evolving relationship between the people and swans of the Chesapeake Bay will be told through a curated collection of decoys, photographs, and artifacts. Photo by David Harp. For more information, visit www.cbmm.org.

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Two boys ca. 1910 with swan hunted in the Easton, MD area, from the collection of C. John Sullivan. Chesapeake Swan Song: From Commodity to Conservation explores the interwoven story of swans and people on the Chesapeake Bay through a selection of swan decoys, photos, artifacts, and ephemera from the 19th and 20th centuries. The exhibition opens at the 45th Annual Waterfowl Festival in Easton, Md. on Friday, November 13, 2015 and continues through Sunday, November 15, 2015. After the Waterfowl Festival, the exhibition will be on display at CBMM’s Waterfowling Building through April 3, 2016. Photo courtesy C. John Sullivan.

Henry Stansbury

Meet: CBMM Vice Chair Henry Stansbury

“There are too many people as it is who don’t understand the importance of Maryland history.”

Henry Stansbury
CBMM Vice Chair Henry Stansbury

Henry Stansbury is a Marylander whose family has been here since the 1600s. It’s a great point of pride that everyone in 10 generations of the family tree has been born and died in the state.  Henry displays the same fondness for the Chesapeake Bay that is visible in any native Marylander.

He fondly remembers his early teenage years, when he would sail in a small boat to Miller Island, and spend the nights there if the flies weren’t too bad. The history and culture of the Chesapeake Bay also led Henry to find his passion: Henry has more than 30 years of interest collecting waterfowl and oystering memorabilia. Henry has also written two books on carvers, and numerous articles on waterfowl heritage.

It was this passion that led him to the Museum. Henry was serving as Maryland Historical Society’s President when CBMM Chief Curator, Pete Lesher, served on the Society’s Museum Committee. Henry worked on the Historical Society’s Maritime Committee, where he helped create exhibitions highlighting decoys. In 2009, Henry became a CBMM Board Member, where he now serves as Vice-Chair. Henry brings experience in volunteer leadership, as well as an incredible depth of knowledge of mid-Atlantic maritime history to the Museum.

As one may guess, Henry’s favorite part of the Museum is the waterfowl exhibition building. Henry has played a key role in building this collection, and is constantly helping CBMM think up new exhibition opportunities to highlight the Chesapeake Bay region’s waterfowl heritage. Most recently, he has been instrumental in creating Chesapeake Swan Song, a new exhibition opening April 11, 2015 that explores the story of the evolving relationship between the people and swans of the Chesapeake Bay through a collection of decoys, photographs, and artifacts from the 19th and 20th centuries. The exhibition runs through April 3, 2016, and Henry encourages all members and their guests to visit this wonderful display.

Henry takes great pride in the Museum. He wishes that everyone knew that CBMM boasts the greatest collection of Chesapeake Bay artifacts, and represents a broad cross section of Bay heritage. It’s diverse in its offerings, which includes the floating fleet, the oystering and waterfowl exhibitions, and numerous education programs for guests of all ages. He believes that the staff and leadership are the Museum’s greatest strengths, and together they create a strong and cohesive operation.

Henry points out that CBMM is in a league of its own when it comes to presenting maritime history in such a comprehensive way, effectively telling the story of the Chesapeake Bay. “There are too many people as it is who don’t understand the importance of Maryland history.” He points out the role of the Bay as a highway which tied Maryland together and provided necessary linkage between food and families. Beyond that, it provided a link to the Midwest and to many international ports.

We would like to thank Henry for his years of dedicated service to the Museum, and especially for his support and sponsorship of the upcoming exhibition, Chesapeake Swan Song: From Commodity to Conservation!