Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum

Daily Cruises, Charters & Programs aboard the 1920 buyboat Winnie Estelle

410-745-2916 • 213 North Talbot Street • St. Michaels, Maryland, 21663 • Dockmaster: VF Channel 16 or 410-745-4946

CBMM

Winnie Estelle Schedule
30-minute cruises on the Miles River

May - September
Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday
12noon, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm
$25 Combined Ticket - River Cruise & Two Day Admission
$15 Non-CBMM Members
$10 CBMM Members
$5 Children ages 6-17
FREE Children under six

Tickets are available at CBMM's Welcome Center, the day of your visit. Museum admission is NOT required to take a cruise. All cruises are weather dependent.

Private Miles River Charters

Special occasions will be remembered for a lifetime when you book a private charter aboard the Winne Estelle. Just imagine, a special birthday party, a sail for your grandkids, or a sunset cocktail curise before a wedding rehearsal dinner.

Day charters aboard the Winnie Estelle are available for your private use. Departs from CBMM along the Miles River. We'll supply the captain, crew, and fuel, all you need to do is supply the people and fun! Availability limited, advanced reservations and 50% deposit required. To book your chater, contact Events Coordinator Ida Heelan at iheelan@cbmm.org or call 410-745-4944.

Adult Educational Cruises

Explore the Chesapeake's rich environment and culture with our
on-the-water programs for adults. From ospreys to oysters, our Education Department can work with you to customize your group's on-the-water experience. Two-week advanced registration required with 50% deposit. Cruises will be rescheduled if needed, due to weather. For more information or to schedule a cruise, contact Visitor Services Manager Megan Fisher at mfisher@cbmm.org or call 410-745-4981.

K-12 School Group Ecology Cruises

K-12 students can learn about the Chesapeake Bay on an authentic Chesapeake Bay workboat. This guided program can be customized for your class's age level. Departs from CBMM in St. Michaels on the Miles River. Availability limited with advanced registration and 50% deposit required. Cruises will be rescheduled if needed, due to weather. For more information or to schedule an ecology cruise, contact Visitor Services Manager Megan fisher at at mfisher@cbmm.org or call 410-745-4981.


PDF Download Winnie Estelle Fact Sheet with pricing

About the Winnie Estelle

The Winnie Estelle is nearly 65 feet in length overall, with a 17-foot beam and
a 3 1/2 foot draft, making her easily maneuverable for shallow water destinations. The Winnie Estelle van accommodate up to 40 passengers. She features a forward view on her canopied deck, with a galley and head on deck and ample storage space below. All cruises are weather dependent.

Built in Crisfield, MD by Noah T. Evans in 1920, the Winnie was used in the lower Chesapeake Bay as a workboat for more than 50 years, carrying seafood and produce to market across Chesapeake Bay. In the 1970s, she made Belize her port of call, where she operated as an island trader, carrying lumber from Honduras to Belize, and later as a dive charter boat. In early 2012, Michael Whitehill of Centreville, MD, purchased the boat, returning her to the Chesapeake Bay on June 17, 2012 with a first stop in Deltaville, VA, where she was greeted by a cheering crowd of onlookers.

A Chesapeake Bay buyboat was historically used for buying and selling seafood. Buyboats purchased oysters or fish from watermen in remote parts of the Chesapeake and carried the fresh catch to city markets or seafood packing houses. According to Larry Chowning, author of the bookChesapeake Bay Buyboats, beginning in the early 20th century, motor buyboats were generally about 40 to 100 feet in length, with a mast and boom forward of the hold, a pilot house aft, and the hull decked over. Depending on their function, similar boats were called freight boats, run boats or crab dredgers, and also called deck boats or mast boats. With her bottom built in deadrise fashion like most other wooden workboats used by the watermen and historically used for buying crabs and fish, the Winnie Estelle is a typical example of the type—though she is rare for surviving in such an unaltered fashion.