CBMM is set to offer private river cruises aboard its historic floating fleet vessels to watch log canoe races on the Miles River.

CBMM is set to offer private river cruises aboard its historic floating fleet vessels to watch log canoe races on the Miles River.

ST. MICHAELS, Md., March 10, 2023 – In the coming months, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is offering private river cruises aboard its historic floating fleet vessels to watch log canoe races on the Miles River.

These two-hour charters, scheduled for June 24 and 25, July 29 and 30, and Sept. 9, 10, 16 and 17, are being offered in place of the log canoe spectator cruises aboard Winnie Estelle, CBMM’s venerable passenger-carrying buyboat that is undergoing a refit in the Shipyard this year.

The cost is $375 per charter for up to six passengers, with a 20% discount for CBMM members. Registration for these cruises is set to open March 17 at bit.ly/LogCanoeCruises2023, with a two-week sign-up period exclusively for CBMM members before open registration begins March 31. The number of charters is limited, and all cruises are dependent on marine conditions.

To become a CBMM member and access early registration as well as the charter discount and all the other exclusive programming and benefits of membership, visit cbmm.org/membership or contact Membership Services Coordinator Debbie Ruzicka at 410-745-4991 or druzicka@cbmm.org.

CBMM is set to offer private river cruises aboard its historic floating fleet vessels to watch log canoe races on the Miles River.

Registration for these private cruises is set to open March 17, with a two-week sign-up period exclusively for CBMM members before open registration begins March 31.

These cruises offer an up-close view of a unique Eastern Shore tradition. Races featuring Chesapeake Bay sailing log canoes are staples of the region with competitions held along the Chester, Miles, Choptank, and Tred Avon rivers.

With an iconic design featuring long masts and large sails, the log canoes keep upright as they accelerate to speeds of 10 knots or more, thanks to crew members climbing to the ends of 15-foot boards that hang off the side.

Amateur photographers, sailing aficionados, and wooden boat enthusiasts will all find something to enjoy on these action-packed charters led by an experienced captain and crew aboard a traditional Bay vessel in CBMM’s floating fleet.

With Winnie Estelle undergoing maintenance, CBMM will also be offering drop-in cruises aboard boats in its floating fleet, including Dory Boat, Volunteer, and Old Point, on Fridays, Saturday, Sundays, and select Mondays, beginning May 19.

These 45-minute Harbor Highlights Tours offer guests the opportunity to explore St. Michaels Harbor, including CBMM’s working waterfront, while learning the history of the port. The cost is $15 per passenger for CBMM members and $25 for non-members.

Passenger cruises aboard Winnie Estelle are expected to resume in 2024.

This winter, there’s a wide array of Bay-inspired themes for youth to explore with the return of CBMM’s STEAM Team and Homeschool Engineering Workshops, in addition to hands-on learning opportunities that include the Rising Tide after-school program, Build It! Workshops and field trips for student groups.

This winter, there’s a wide array of Bay-inspired themes for youth to explore with the return of CBMM’s STEAM Team and Homeschool Engineering Workshops, in addition to hands-on learning opportunities that include the Rising Tide after-school program, Build It! Workshops and field trips for student groups.

ST. MICHAELS, Md., Jan. 6, 2023 – With the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s youth education programs, the Bay provides a lens for understanding the wider world.

This winter, there’s a wide array of themes to explore with the return of CBMM’s STEAM Team and Homeschool Engineering Workshops, in addition to hands-on learning opportunities that include the Rising Tide after-school program, Build It! Workshops and field trips for student groups.

CBMM’s STEAM Team returns with a new lesson each Saturday in February. Led by an experienced educator, children will explore Chesapeake-related topics that incorporate a variety of activities related to Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math with sessions available for ages 4-6 (10am-noon) and 7-9 (1-3pm).

The first winter edition, titled Sink or Float – Discovering Density, is set for Feb. 4, and the programs to follow include We Love Boats! (Feb. 11), Observing Oysters (Feb. 18), and Engineering Extravaganza (Feb. 25). March 4 is reserved as an inclement weather make-up date.

Class sizes are limited, with advanced registration required. The cost per class is $15, with a 20% discount for CBMM members.

Register online for all four sessions for an additional discount or sign up for individual classes. Need-based scholarships are available by emailing registration@cbmm.org. To register, visit bit.ly/WinterSTEAMTeam23.

This winter, participants in the Rising Tide after-school program are set to begin work, alongside apprentices from CBMM’s Shipyard, on the build of a St. Michaels scow.

This winter, participants in the Rising Tide after-school program are set to begin work, alongside apprentices from CBMM’s Shipyard, on the build of a St. Michaels scow.

During Homeschool Engineering Workshops on Feb. 8 and Feb. 23, students will work together to design, build, test, and improve their solution to a problem within the Bay using the Engineering Design Process.

This two-hour workshop focuses on creative collaboration, engineering learning, and problem solving. Admission to CBMM is included for all participants. Both days, there is a session designed for ages 9-13 from 10:30am-12:30pm followed by one for ages 13-18 from 1:30-3:30pm.

The cost is $15 per student, with a 20% discount for CBMM members. Chaperones are welcome to drop off students, sit-in on the program, or tour CBMM’s campus with a trained docent. To register, visit bit.ly/CBMMHomeschool.

Targeted at sixth-through-ninth graders, Rising Tide teaches the basics of tool use, following a build plan, and woodworking techniques. After completing work on a pair of stand-up paddleboards in the fall, participants are set to begin work, alongside apprentices from CBMM’s Shipyard, on the build of a St. Michaels scow.

Resuming Jan. 23, Rising Tide runs from 3:30-5:30pm on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays. Transportation is offered from the Easton YMCA and from St. Michaels Middle/High School. No experience is necessary for this free program, and new participants are welcome throughout the year. Contact risingtide@cbmm.org for more information.

CBMM’s Build It! Workshops provide hands-on fun for groups of all ages. These programs combine safety and hands-on construction techniques to provide a real-world application for mathematics skills, science concepts, and engineering design.

Under the guidance of a CBMM educator, students use tools to build either individual or group projects, such as bat boxes or oyster cages. The workshops are great for Scout troops, birthday parties, homeschool lessons, and even family gatherings. Prices vary depending on the project. At least three weeks’ advanced notice is required. Contact registration@cbmm.org for more information.

Student groups, including school, Scout, and other youth programs, are encouraged to contact registration@cbmm.org for more information about scheduling a field trip to CBMM in 2023. Group offerings include the popular Lighthouse Overnight Adventure program, which resumes in April with the opportunity to spend a night on campus in the Hooper Strait Lighthouse.

With offerings for ages 4-15, CBMM Summer Camps deliver Chesapeake-themed, hands-on activities, stories, games, and crafts that help bring children closer to the Bay.

With offerings for ages 4-15, CBMM Summer Camps deliver Chesapeake-themed, hands-on activities, stories, games, and crafts that help bring children closer to the Bay.

ST. MICHAELS, Md., Dec. 20, 2022 – As the calendar flips to 2023, it’s the perfect time to make summer plans, and the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s popular summer camps will return this year offering Bay-themed fun for children ages 4-15.

Registration is set to open on Jan. 2, 2023, for these weeklong camps, which run from June 26-Aug. 18, with a two-week sign-up period exclusively for CBMM members before open registration begins on Jan. 17.

To register for CBMM’s Sea Squirts, Terrapins, Summer Workshop, or Museum Masters camps, visit cbmm.org/summercamps. All sessions are limited to a maximum of 12 children, so early registration is encouraged.

The full day camps cost $355 per week, while the half-day Sea Squirts camp cost is $155 per week. CBMM members are offered a 20% discount on tuition, and scholarships are available for campers with financial need.

Registration for CBMM’s popular summer camps opens on Jan. 2, 2023, with a two-week sign-up period exclusively for CBMM members. (Photo by Eliot Aust)

Registration for CBMM’s popular summer camps opens on Jan. 2, 2023, with a two-week sign-up period exclusively for CBMM members. (Photo by Eliot Aust)

In a small-group setting following age-appropriate lesson plans, CBMM summer campers explore the magic of the Bay’s people, animals, traditions, and environment while taking advantage of all CBMM’s 18-acre waterfront campus has to offer. The programs put an emphasis on creating a fun, hands-on learning environment that includes on-the-water and environmental activities, stories, games, crafts, and other creative projects.

The Sea Squirts camp, designed for children 4-6 years old, will be offered from 9am-noon Monday-Friday for a total of six weeks, while the full-day Terrapins camp, for children entering grades 1-3, runs from 9am-4pm over an eight-week period.

Both of these camps will follow a different theme weekly, including Chesapeake Critters: Aquatic Animals (June 26-30), Red, White, & Bay (July 3-7), Water, Water, Everywhere! (July 10-14), Shipwrecked! (July 17-21), Feathers, Fins, & Furs (July 24-28), Bay Scientists (July 31-Aug. 4), Go Green! (Aug. 7-11) and Chesapeake Critters: Land & Sky (Aug. 14-18).

Geared toward older children, CBMM’s Summer Workshop camp offers the chance to spend time both in the workshop and on the water while learning new skills in a fun and creative environment.

This program will be offered for campers in grades four-six during the weeks of July 3, July 17, July 31, and Aug. 14, and in grades six-nine during the weeks of July 10, July 24, and Aug. 7. These sessions run from 9am-4pm, Monday-Friday.

New for 2023, the Museum Masters program offers campers a behind-the-scenes pass to CBMM to learn all that goes into a museum and its exhibitions. This camp, offered to grades 4-6 the week of July 10 and grades 6-9 the week of July 17, presents a unique opportunity to explore CBMM’s collection and help curate a special group exhibit.

Contact registration@cbmm.org with questions about this year’s camp offerings or for registration support. To become a CBMM member and access early registration as well as the tuition discount, visit cbmm.org/membership or contact Membership Services Coordinator Debbie Ruzicka at 410-745-4991 or druzicka@cbmm.org.

 

CBMM’s Speaker Series returns in 2023 with five winter events, starting with “Deadly Gamble: The Wreck of Schooner Levin J. Marvel” on Jan. 12 in Van Lennep Auditorium. (Photo by Sharon Thorpe)

CBMM’s Speaker Series returns in 2023 with five winter events, starting with “Deadly Gamble: The Wreck of Schooner Levin J. Marvel” on Jan. 12 in Van Lennep Auditorium. (Photo by Sharon Thorpe)

ST. MICHAELS, Md., Dec. 12, 2022 – The new year brings the return of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s Speaker Series, with five events on the upcoming schedule highlighting unique human experiences in the Chesapeake Bay region.

The winter programming, hosted in CBMM’s Van Lennep Auditorium, includes three local authors sharing their historical expertise as well as a pair of events that explore the Bay’s foodways and culinary traditions with support from the Upper Shore Folklife Center. Each talk will offer insight into how the events of the past influence our lives today.

The suggested cost per session is $8 per person, with both in-person and virtual options. To sign up, or for more information, visit bit.ly/CBMMSpeakerSeries.

The winter series kicks off on Jan. 12, 2023, at 5:30pm with “Deadly Gamble: The Wreck of Schooner Levin J. Marvel.”

Author of a recently published book on the Bay’s deadliest shipwreck, Kathy Bergren Smith will present a tale that is part sea story, part courtroom drama, detailing the harrowing wreck of the Chesapeake ram schooner Levin J. Marvel amid Hurricane Connie in the Bay near North Beach, Md., in August 1955 as well as the ensuing legal and legislative fallout.

In “From the Ground Up: An Archaeologist’s Perspective on Native Chesapeake Foods” on Feb. 1 at 3pm, local archaeologist, TimeChef, and food historian Henry Ward will share a culinary exploration of recipes that celebrate indigenous foods and native cuisine of the Chesapeake region.

Joining two of his passions, Ward will discuss how his archaeological investigations shaped his perspective on these food items and inspired the development and preparation of the recipes.

On Feb. 16 at 5:30pm, CBMM will honor the 205th birthday of Frederick Douglass with a program pairing excerpts of Douglass’ writing and speeches with images from St. Michaels resident Jeff McGuiness’ book, “Bear Me Into Freedom: The Talbot County of Frederick Douglass.”

The book, published last fall, offers a photo essay tracing the places central to Douglass’ early life as an enslaved person on the Eastern Shore of Maryland before he escaped to freedom and became a national leader in the fight to abolish slavery.

The series continues March 8 at 3:30pm with “Hurricane Agnes – Fifty Years After Catastrophe.”

In this talk rescheduled from the fall, Gary Letcher, author of “Bold Forecast: The Hurricane Agnes Deluge,” will recount the story of the 1972 storm that brought the most rain and wreaked the worst damage in U.S. history up to its time, while making an impact on the Bay that is still felt 50 years later, in a compelling narrative brings home the power of nature – and the power of ordinary people in the face of epic catastrophe. Letcher’s book is available for pre-purchase for $17 through the registration portal.

The final event on the schedule, “Old Line Plate: Uncovering the Stories Behind Maryland’s Historic Recipes,” comes a week later on March 15 at 5:30pm.

Kara Harris, author of the Old Line Plate blog, will dig into the state’s culinary past by examining the kind of cookbooks that have raised money for churches and charities, while also documenting regional food traditions, over generations. The recipes inside these books can tell the story of a meal, a cook, and even a community, and in this talk, Harris will explore the stories of the lives lived between the meals, and the culinary legacies left behind.

Find more information about all of CBMM’s upcoming events at cbmm.org/events.

Students in CBMM’s Rising Tide program gathered on Sunday to celebrate the completion of their latest project. (Photo by George Sass)

Students in CBMM’s Rising Tide program gathered on Sunday to celebrate the completion of their latest project. (Photo by George Sass)

ST. MICHAELS, Md., Nov. 21, 2022 – A crowd of family, friends and supporters gathered Sunday afternoon around Fogg’s Cove on the campus of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum to celebrate the latest completed project for the Rising Tide after-school program.

Since last winter, a group of local middle school students have been working to build two stand-up paddleboards through the CBMM program, and during the Eastern Shore Sea Glass & Coastal Arts Festival, they marked a job well done with a festive celebration on a chilly afternoon that included a ceremonial splashing of the boards as well as a sparkling apple juice toast.

It was a milestone day for Rising Tide, which has been teaching students in grades 6-9 basic boatbuilding and woodworking skills in a welcoming, relaxed environment since 2015.

“I am extremely proud of the hard work that these students have put into the build of these paddleboards,” said CBMM Workshop Education Manager Kendall Wallace, who oversees the program. “With involvement at absolutely every step of the building process, the students learned many new skills, and those who had never used a plane, clamp, or chisel quickly became masters of the craft.”

“I sincerely hope that the lessons of dedication, persistence, and precision that were practiced through this project will serve as foundations for their futures inside and outside of the workshop.”

Students in the Rising Tide program celebrated the completion of their stand-up paddleboard project with a ceremonial splashing. (Photo by George Sass)

Students in the Rising Tide program celebrated the completion of their stand-up paddleboard project with a ceremonial splashing. (Photo by George Sass)

A dozen Rising Tide participants, led by CBMM staff and volunteers, worked together over approximately six months, with a summer break for camp programming, to bring the paddleboards to life.

The first few months were filled with the prep work, including building ladder and rocker tables, sawing cedar for the top and bottom panels, and assembling the internal skeleton frame.

Once the program resumed in September, the focus turned to bead and cove strip rail assembly, top panel attachment, and shaping. Last week, the group sealed the boards with fiberglass and epoxy in the final step to get them ready for the water.

Constructing two boards meant twice as much action for the students to keep all hands busy during class time. One was recently auctioned off to help support the program, and the other will remain in CBMM’s fleet of paddle craft as an enduring reminder of the hard work of the students to take the project from start to finish.

“Although the project had a few complicated steps, most of the work was straightforward and fun,” Wallace said. “It was a great experience for the students to take ownership of the work and see how each component makes the paddleboard look more complete.”

In December, Rising Tide will focus on a series of holiday workshops that offer a free opportunity for students to create unique homemade gifts for family and friends. (Register here today.)

After a holiday break, the program will return in the new year, starting on Jan. 23, to tackle another exciting project. This time, the students will work alongside apprentices from CBMM’s Shipyard on the build of a St. Michaels scow.

The program meets each Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday after school from 3:30-5:30pm at CBMM. Transportation is offered from the Easton YMCA and St. Michaels Middle/High School.

Register at bit.ly/RisingTide2022 or email risingtide@cbmm.org for more information.

Local teen Caden Lewis took the lead on restorations to CBMM’s crabbing skiff Cinnamon Girl over the summer.

Local teen Caden Lewis took the lead on restorations to CBMM’s crabbing skiff Cinnamon Girl over the summer.

ST. MICHAELS, Md., Sept. 22, 2022 – A crowd gathered at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s dock on Aug. 3 to see Caden Lewis and Cinnamon Girl off on a quick sail around St. Michaels Harbor months in the making.

The local 16-year-old devoted his summer to fixing up the 16-foot, two-sail bateu crabbing skiff, and that morning, he finally hit the water, accompanied by CBMM volunteer Don Boehl, with appropriate fanfare from an audience of CBMM shipyard crew who’d witnessed the boat’s restoration.

“It was a feeling of relief, like, ‘I did this,’” Lewis said. “I did it, some by myself and some of it with other people, and working so hard on that boat, it was really special to me to finally get it done.”

The moment was a testament to Lewis’ growing passion for the trade and the skills that he’s developed in recent years at CBMM, first as a member of its Rising Tide youth program and lately as a volunteer eager to chip in around the shipyard.

Lewis first sailed Cinnamon Girl, built in 1995 based on a historic design, last fall during the Mid-Atlantic Small Craft Festival, and while the boat remains a work-in-progress, he’s excited to be able to showcase his efforts to bring it back to life at the latest MASCF, which runs Sept. 30-Oct. 2 at CBMM.

“The main thing I learned through this project is that everything is not going to be done in one day or a month or even two months,” Lewis said. “You have to really take it day-by-day and trust in the work that you’re doing.”

Cinnamon Girl is back in the water with its original nameboards.

Cinnamon Girl is back in the water with its original nameboards.

Lewis has been a regular around CBMM since joining Rising Tide as a sixth-grader. That first year, he helped build a pair of Smith Island skiffs as part of the after-school program.

Since then, he’s learned a lot by watching, talking to staff and volunteers, and lending a hand at every opportunity.

“It’s a second home for me,” said Lewis, now a junior at St. Michaels High School. “It’s a safe place to go, it’s somewhere to take your mind off things and it’s somewhere you can go learn.

“I’ve learned so much there, from Rising Tide, being around for the Maryland Dove build, and working on the floating fleet. I go every chance that I get. For me, it’s one of the best places to be.”

Last summer, Shipyard Education Programs Manager Jenn Kuhn asked Lewis to be a youth volunteer at the shipyard. He excelled in that role, and when he asked to fix up Cinnamon Girl in the spring, Kuhn had no hesitation offering the green light.

“I’m just proud of him,” Kuhn said. “That he’s been so engaged and dedicated to this work is a testament to his character. He will go far because he’s very inquisitive, and thoughtful, and interested, and he’s not afraid to put himself out there.”

Once part of CBMM’s rental livery, Cinnamon Girl was in need of TLC when Lewis went to work.

After school let out for the summer in June, the teenager made the bike trip to CBMM every day that he could around responsibilities helping Capt. Ed Farley on the historic skipjack H.M. Krentz and a volunteer role at the St. Michaels Fire Department.

Over a period of weeks, Lewis led repairs to the stem, rub rails, and transom, among other refurbishments. While painting, he discovered a rotten plank that added to the hours.

It was a difficult job made easier by the family environment at CBMM, he said.

“It really put into perspective that I can use what I’ve learned in Rising Tide and put it into action,” Lewis said. “I’m proud of all that I was able to do by myself, and of course, I have to thank all the people that helped guide me along, too.”

Kevin Brennan built Cinnamon Girl in 1995 and sailed it around the region, including regular trips to CBMM for MASCF. Photo courtesy Kevin Brennan.

Kevin Brennan built Cinnamon Girl in 1995 and sailed it around the region, including regular trips to CBMM for MASCF. Photo courtesy Kevin Brennan.

A few weeks after Cinnamon Girl returned to the water, Lewis got a visit from Kevin Brennan.

Brennan built the boat nearly three decades ago using largely found wood and plans from noted maritime historian Howard I. Chapelle via the Smithsonian Institute. 

He’d sailed it around the region, including many visits to St. Michaels Harbor for the annual fall races, before selling it to Mike Moore, who eventually donated the boat to CBMM.

Brennan was happy to answer all of Lewis’ questions about Cinnamon Girl and see it sparkling again.

“It meant a lot to learn that not only somebody took an interest in it, but it was a 16-year-old who worked to bring it back to life,” said Brennan, who has been faithfully attending MASCF since 1989. “It’s just really cool that CBMM has allowed Caden to do this and given him the tutelage that he’s needed to learn by hands-on experience. It gives hope for the future of small craft.”

Since Brennan sold the boat, the nameboards have hung above his home office in the Baltimore area. He was proud to present them to Lewis last month, and they’re now back on the boat for all CBMM guests to see.

“When I was working on the boat, in the back of my mind, I was wondering if it had nameboards to it,” Lewis said. “Now people will know, ‘That’s Cinnamon Girl. That’s the boat Kevin Brennan built. That’s the boat that Caden Lewis rebuilt.’ That’s a really good feeling.”